• Basic Laundry to landscape setup that will put 3,900 gallons of Grey Water into the landscape every year
  • This system directs Grey water from the wash machine through the floor and out of a vent to the landscape
  • The water is directed to three large mulch basins that will sustain a group of ornamental bushes, a redwood tree and another thirsty tree
  • Concrete had to be cut to remove a potential tripping hazard.
  • This simple design will make a difference by reducing fresh water irrigation and recharging the local aquifer.
  • Storm water Management; ~~9,000 gallons of storm water put to used on the property
  • One downspout leads to a 265 gallon slimline rain barrel then overflows into a raised bed where trees will be planted
  • The other downspout goes directly to the other side of the raised bed
  • When it rains the water will flow to the raised bed from two sides and meet in the middle
  • All of this water will sustain trees that will provide privacy, shade, clean air and INCREASE PROPERTY VALUE.
  • Why not use the water that lands on your roof and increase the value of your home!
  • San Francisco Laundry 2 Landscape system that will put 150 gallons a week, 600 gallons a month and 7,800 gallons a year into the landscape
  • Previous wash machine drain simply "hung out" in the wash basin and was unsightly.  L2L piping is an aesthetic improvement.
  • 6 small basins were installed for the smaller bushes and a single large basin was put in place for the thirsty young fruit trees.
  • Lawn will be removed in the future and replaced with a less thirsty native grass that will accent the periphery plantings.
  • 7,800 fewer gallons a year for the SFPUC to process and send to the Bay; better use of this Hetch Hetchy water and it is used TWICE!
  • Two 865 gallon tanks installed on two sides of a home that will catch rain water during the winter months and will be used for local irrigation.
  • The tanks are 5'1" in diameter and 6'3" tall yet they still tuck away nicely and do not block traffic.
  • The first water off of the roof goes into a first flush system, that is visible, which catches the initial water from the roof.  This chamber fills and diverts the clean water into the storage tank.
  • The overflow goes into a french drain that was the original destination for all of the storm water.
  • The tanks sit on pads filled with drain rock and bordered by 2" X 6" pressure treated wood.  These pads will evenly distribute the weight of the water.